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Did You Use Business Cards at Lotusphere?

It occurred to me that I forgot to even bring business cards with me to Lotusphere.  While I met several new people, we seemed to exchange Twitter IDs more than anything else, and usually on our mobile devices.  Occasionally I entered a new email address or phone number.

Only once during the conference, was I asked for an actual business card.  I took one of theirs and wrote on the back of it.

Did you use business cards at Lotusphere?  Or are they becoming a thing of the past?  Did you use a service like Bump or something else?

  • http://twitter.com/DSchaffer David Schaffer

    Was asked for a few by vendors but used mine mostly to throw into bowls for drawings!

  • Alan Lepofsky

    Yes I still gave out and received many business cards. Each night I would then send LinkedIN invitations to these new contacts, with a personal message reminding them of our discussion.

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    Alan, do you think that’s because you met more new people, or because of your new role?  (Or both?)  Did anyone ask or offer up an alternative?

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    Drawings, of course!  Can’t forget about those!

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    I was asked on Twitter if I can recommend a good app for exchanging info.  As I don’t seem to have a need, I can’t.  Anyone else recommend a good one?  The hurdle seems to be that it needs to work on multiple devices and not on it’s own device that one would purchase and carry around separately.  And of course, it’s got to be easy to use, and yet, let you tailor the information exchanged.

  • Paul Calhoun

    All our new cards came with a q-code that links to an e-card online with all of our contact information.  That said as I was working the booth a great deal, I passed out a lot of cards.

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    You passed them out, but did anyone actually want them?

  • http://www.facebook.com/bruceelgort Bruce Elgort

    I brought 500. Came back with 20.

  • Lars Olufsen

    Way to kill the topic, Bruce! LOL

  • Carl Tyler

    I like Bruce, took a load and came back with a few.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bruceelgort Bruce Elgort

    Sorry :(

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    So what you’re all saying is that I’m just a loser.

  • http://www.texasswede.com TexasSwede

    I brought a bunch, perhaps 100 or so. Came back with most of them. I mainly handed them out in meetings, and to some people that I did not know. My cards are part of my “TexasSwede” brand. Even if the information on the back contains email, twitter, linkedin and my blog, the main purpose is to make people remember me through my logo on the front.
    So for me it is mainly a way to reinforce my “brand” (if you can call an online nick that).

  • http://www.facebook.com/bruceelgort Bruce Elgort

    Not at all. I went to LS with the intention of meeting new BP’s and customers. I also gave out 50-100 to the GBS College kids. They have already been sending me emails for advice and help with techie stuff. 

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    That’s awesome to hear, Bruce.  Especially about the college kids!  Very cool.

  • http://www.runningnotes.net Kathy Brown

    That’s awesome to hear, Bruce.  Especially about the college kids!  Very cool.

  • http://twitter.com/PeterPresnell Peter Presnell

    Like Bruce I gave away a lot of cards at the GBS College events… I also gave away to a few other people mainly because my business cards now carry a long list of the social media sites I use.

  • http://TheSocialNetworker.com IdoNotes

    There is a fine line between just handing them out, just collecting and putting context.  So I did two things.

    I brought a ton like some of the other comments.  I gave out a decent amount.  A few to the college kids at my table and then some direct contact vendors and people that directly asked.

    I tried my best to use Hashable (multi platform) to grab their Twitter id and make contextual contact lists.  If they do their bio and other links right I get everything including a picture from their avatar which is way better than a card.

    It is so hard to get adoption on being more digital or simplified with a QR I can scan to get a living page. 

    I do like Alan’s approach of adding in LinkedIn as well, something to consider to add in.

  • Alan Lepofsky

    No alternatives discussed. No messing around with phones, finding apps, going to web sites… simple “hi, here’s my card”

  • Alan Lepofsky

    No alternatives discussed. No messing around with phones, finding apps, going to web sites… simple “hi, here’s my card”

  • http://www.alanlepofsky.net Alan Lepofsky

    No alternatives discussed. No messing around with phones, finding apps, going to web sites… simple “hi, here’s my card”

  • http://www.alanlepofsky.net Alan Lepofsky

    You could investigate LinkedIn Cardmunch or Evernote Hello.

  • http://www.facebook.com/richard.h.schwartz Richard H. Schwartz

    I also forgot to bring cards. Thought I had a stash at home, so I didn’t bring any from the office, and when I packed my bags I discovered that didn’t actually have any at home.  And I decided this wasn’t a big deal anyhow, since my cards have only my employer-related info, and I don’t really want to limit the exchange of info to just that.

    I collected 8-10 cards during the conference (excluding the pro-forma ones that I didn’t actually ask for).  I used my phone to email my info to about the same number of people, or to connect directly if they were on LinkedIn.  

  • Bill Malchisky Jr.

    I refresh the content on my business cards annually, just before Lotusphere. Helps to ensure currency. Brought a lot, came back with a few, like several people commented in the main thread.

    Though, I would think there is a correlation between bringing then passing out cards and the person’s role. If one is an admin/dev there is less of a need for cards — outside of drawings — than if one runs a business. Bruce, Carl, and I, for example, are BPs who want people to be able to find us if they could use our services. If one is an employee of a customer, they attend to learn and help their boss, so to speak. Different use case equates different need.

  • Richard Shergold

    Those kids are still using e-mail?