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Review: Java Cookbook

Java Cookbook
by Ian F. Darwin
Publisher: O’Reilly Publishing

Content

  1. Getting Started: Compiling, Running, and Debugging
  2. Interacting with the Environment
  3. Strings and Things
  4. Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions
  5. Numbers
  6. Dates and Times – New API
  7. Structuring Data with Java
  8. Object-Oriented Techniques
  9. Functional Programming Techniques: Functional Interfaces, Streams, Parallel Collections
  10. Input and Output
  11. Directory and Filesystem Operations
  12. Media: Graphics, Audio, Video
  13. Network Clients
  14. Graphical User Interfaces
  15. Internationalization and Localization
  16. Server-Side Java
  17. Java and Electronic Mail
  18. Database Access
  19. Processing JSON Data
  20. Processing XML
  21. Packages and Packaging
  22. Threaded Java
  23. Reflection, or “A Class Named Class”
  24. Using Java with Other Languages

There are over 800 pages in this third edition of the Java Cookbook. The book states that it is not for beginners, and that is correct.  While some basics of Java are covered in order to move on to other topics, this is not a book for learning Java. Incidentally, the book includes a great resources section including many books for learning Java and general programming.

As you can see from the table of contents, this is a very thorough book covering many topics. I liked the format of “Problem”, “Solution”, and “Discussion”, however, it doesn’t “read” like a book. These are “recipes” lumped together by topic, but not necessarily sequential.  It made it hard for me to either browse the book or find any one particular problem.

The Java Cookbook is filled with loads of examples and sample code. There are tons of solutions to be found. I found it incredibly thorough, but very dry and a bit difficult to navigate.

Obtained From: Publisher
Payment: Free